2018 NPH Conference Workshops

SESSION 1 (9:15-10:45AM)

 


Advancing Equity in Housing (Session 1)

Race, Displacement, and the Resegregation of the Bay Area

Housing unaffordability and displacement pressure have contributed to dramatic shifts in the geography of where low-income people of color live in the Bay Area. These shifts have real implications for racial and economic inequality in the region; research has shown that localized factors such as poverty rates, local schools, and exposure to environmental pollution have significant effects on child development, economic mobility, and health outcomes for both children and adults. New research from the UC Berkeley Urban Displacement Project and the California Housing Partnership shows the relationship between rising housing prices and neighborhood-level demographic shifts across the Bay Area and demonstrates how these shifts are perpetuating historic patterns of segregation and unequal access to opportunity for low-income people of color in the region. Anti-displacement advocates working across the Bay Area will describe this researches’ implications for policy and advocacy around preventing displacement, addressing housing affordability, and increasing access to opportunity for low-income people of color.
All Skill Levels
Audience: Advocates, Community Organizing Staff, Developers, Government Staff
Moderator: Dan Rinzler, California Housing Partnership
Panel: Jennifer Martinez, PICO Bay Area; Mashael Majid, Urban Habitat; Miriam Zuk, UC Berkeley Center for Community Innovation/Urban Displacement Project; Samuel Tepperman-Gelfant, Public Advocates


Asset Management, Property Management & Resident Services (Session 1)

Immigrants, Welcome Home: Know Your Rights, Protect Your Tenants

This workshop directly addresses the intersection of immigrant justice and housing justice, and provides the affordable housing industry tools to inform and protect residents under the current political climate and administration. This workshop features short presentations from a nonprofit developer and legal experts, and provides ample time for Q&A to teach you what to do if ICE, or other enforcement agents, show up at your affordable property, how to equip on-site staff and residents with information about their rights, and how to operate in compliance with the immigration restrictions of federal housing funding. This workshop is open to all, but is especially geared for property management and services staff.
Beginner
Audience: Advocates, Attorneys, Community Organizing Staff, Project Managers, Resident Services Staff
Moderator: Elissa Dennis, Community Economics
Panel: Chirag Bhakta, Mission Housing Development Corporation; Karlo Ng, National Housing Law Project; Phillip Babich, Reed Smith; Sam Moss, Mission Housing Development Corporation

View Presentation.


Housing Development (Session 1)

A Formidable Force: Collaborating with Congregations to Create Housing

In an era of extreme housing scarcity, escalating construction costs, heightened interest in more dense multi-use buildings, and an evolving funding and regulatory environment, collaborating with faith communities to create affordable housing is a model many communities want to use. The power of a patient, mission-driven land-owner is not to be underestimated! This workshop will share innovative approaches, including collaboration among congregations and using philanthropic investments instead of public funds, as well as time-tested best practices for succeeding and avoiding common pitfalls. Come hear and share ideas with the panelists, including a developer specializing in faith-based collaboration, a new organization creating synergy among congregations interested in housing development, and a non-traditional developer working with philanthropy and churches to create mixed-income homes.
All Skill Levels
Audience: Advocates, Attorneys, Developers, Fund Development Staff, Government Staff, Lenders, Project Managers
Moderator: Alicia Klein, Resources for Community Development
Panel: Dino Thomas Adelfio, New Way Homes; Don Stump, Christian Church Homes; Pastor LJ Jennings, Bay Area Community Benefit Organization

View Presentation.


Housing Development (Session 1)

Modular Development: Managing Your Project to Achieve Savings

Modular design and construction promises to increase efficiencies in the development process, leading to potential savings, which is invaluable to affordable housing development needing to meet both competitive and regulatory cost and schedule requirements. While these promises may be attainable, achieving efficiencies is dependent on effectively managing elements of the development process that are unique to modular design and construction. This workshop will provide a grounded understanding of modular design and construction focused on achieving the efficiencies inherent in modular development. Using the standard real estate development process, from site studies and zoning to design and permitting, costing, and construction, as well as finance and risk evaluation, the experienced panelists in modular building will provide insights, guidance, and project management tools to help you start your project on a path toward achieving efficiencies in modular building.
All Skill Levels
Audience: Asset Managers, Attorneys, Developers, Government Staff, Lenders, Project Managers
Moderator: Ed Holder, Mercy Housing California
Panel: Ann Silverberg, Related California; Chris Schmidt, Guerdon Modular Builders; Deanne Tipton, Cahill contractors; Nick Gomez, Lowney Architecture

View Presentation.


Housing Finance (Session 1)

How to Drive a Hybrid: Combining 4% and 9% Tax Credit Projects

Combining 4% and 9% tax credit projects into “hybrids” is getting increased interest from affordable housing developers in the wake of the California Tax Credit Allocation Committee’s (TCAC) Regulation changes to accommodate and encourage these combined 4%/9% projects. In this workshop you’ll hear from TCAC about the Regulation changes, and look at case studies of current hybrid projects. We’ll discuss the options for structuring hybrid projects, as well as some of the complications, and look at what project types may be the best fit for this financing model.
Intermediate
Audience: Accountants, Asset Managers, Attorneys, Developers, Government Staff, Lenders, Project Managers
Moderator: Diana Downton, Community Economics
Panel: Alice Talcott, MidPen Housing; Elizabeth Kuwada, Eden Housing; Kyle Arndt, Bocarsly Emden Cowan Esmail & Arndt LLP; Mark Stivers, California Tax Credit Allocation Committee

View Presentation.


Housing Finance (Session 1)

The Secrets of LIHTC Investors

Can a discussion on tax credits be even remotely entertaining? After two years of tax reform what are investors thinking? Is the LIHTC equity alive and well? Is there appetite for all of your developments? How high will pricing go? How can we structure our deals with investors to mitigate the challenges created by tax reform? We’ll try our best to answer all these questions. Participants will be provided with a rare and unfiltered opportunity to observe and question tax credit investors in person.
Intermediate, Advanced
Audience: Attorneys, Developers, Government Staff, Lenders
Moderator: Rich Gross, Enterprise Community Partners
Panel: Richard Mandel, California Housing Partnership; Kevin Knudtson, Community Economics; Additionally, the panel will include tax credit investors and syndicators.


Policy & Advocacy (Session 1)

Federal Housing Policy After Tax Reform

DC-based housing experts will lead a discussion on the outlook for affordable rental housing funding and policy under a new tax code and in anticipation of the upcoming midterm elections. They will also discuss the housing provisions of the FY 2018 omnibus legislation, the outlook for FY 2019 funding levels for key HUD programs, the prospects for LIHTC legislation, CRA regulatory reform, rent reform, and advocacy priorities and opportunities for California. Attendees will have a chance to pose their own questions and discuss advocacy priorities and opportunities for California.
All Skill Levels
Audience: All sectors
Moderator: Matt Schwartz, California Housing Partnership
Panel: Peter Lawrence, Novogradac & Company LLP; Sarah Mickelson, National Low Income Housing Coalition


Policy & Advocacy (Session 1)

Fighting Gentrification and Displacement with Housing Acquisition

As gentrification pressures continue to increase in low-income communities, our affordable housing strategies need to diversify. Acquisition of existing rental housing and conversion to permanent nonprofit ownership is an effective stabilization strategy, particularly in “hot market” urban neighborhoods where much of the housing stock is small-scale buildings at high risk of speculation and tenant evictions. A new impact report on the value of this acquisition approach as a strategy to counter gentrification and displacement risks will be in fresh circulation at the time of the NPH Conference. Several affordable housing organizations in San Francisco are carrying out this work. The program is beginning to scale, and housing organizations in Oakland have launched a similar acquisition program. At the regional level, the Bay Area Metropolitan Transportation Commission is launching a “Preservation Pilot” initiative with intent to support acquisition programs on the ground in jurisdictions across the region, and the regional “CASA” process has included housing preservation as one of three primary legs of the housing affordability solutions emerging from that dialogue this year. At this workshop, hear about lessons learned and innovative approaches from a panel of practitioners working on the ground and in creative financing with acq/rehab programs, and discuss scalable opportunities ahead.
Intermediate
Audience: Advocates, Asset Managers, Community Organizing Staff, Developers, Government Staff, Lenders, Project Managers
Moderator: Peter Cohen, Council of Community Housing Organizations
Panel: Deven Richardson, San Francisco Housing Development Corporation; Geeta Rao, Enterprise Community Partners; Jason Vargas, East Bay Asian Local Development Corporation; Karoleen Feng, Mission Economic Development Agency; Rebecca Foster, San Francisco Housing Accelerator Fund

View Presentation.


Policy & Advocacy (Session 1)

Public Land for Public Good! Affordable Housing Efforts and Publicly-Owned Land

We all know the three main elements needed for affordable housing: land, funding, and political/public will. In a sense, publicly-owned land has the potential to provide all three of these elements. Advocates are increasingly focused on how to leverage land owned by jurisdictions and public agencies to produce housing, but also to potentially stabilize communities and fund preservation and protection, while ensuring that public entities think differently about land – as an asset to advance equity. Learn about statewide legislative efforts, regional work, and local campaigns in the East Bay and South Bay that promote public land for the public good.
Beginner, Intermediate
Audience: Advocates, Attorneys, Community Organizing Staff, Developers, Government Staff, Project Managers, All Sectors
Moderator: Ain Bailey, Great Communities Collaborative
Panel: Gloria Bruce, East Bay Housing Organizations; Jeff Levin, East Bay Housing Organizations; Louise Auerhahn, Working Partnerships USA; Pedro Galvao, Non-Profit Housing Association of Northern California


SESSION 2 (1:45PM-3:15PM)


Advancing Equity in Housing (Session 2)

Leading from the Center: Making Inclusion a Reality

As affordable housing providers, equity is at the heart of our missions and our values, but that doesn’t mean we automatically know how to address bias in a meeting, diversify our boards, or post job descriptions that will bring culturally competent, qualified candidates into our organizations. Comprised of directors, staff, and consultants, this panel presents learnings from Eden Housing as well as from Resources for Community Development (RCD)’s Inclusion Inventory – a YWCA-guided six-month review of the organization’s policies and practices through a lens of racial and gender justice. Participants will learn concrete tools for assessing inclusive practices at their own organizations, as well as key takeaways from Eden’s HR perspective and RCD’s experience with the Inclusion Inventory, including challenges and stories of success.
Intermediate, Advanced
Audience: Advocates, Community Organizing Staff, Executive Leadership and Directors, Project Managers, Resident Services Staff
Moderator: Laura Eberly, YWCA San Francisco & Marin
Panel: Andy Madeira, Eden Housing; Kalenga Pembamoto, Eden Housing; Oshalla Dee Marcus, Oshalla Arts and Wellness and YWCA San Francisco & Marin; Olivia King, Resources for Community Development


Advancing Equity in Housing (Session 2)

The Village Raises the Kids: Community Resiliency in Public Housing

Building momentum means creating change through community healing and resiliency. For children growing up in public housing, resilience to stress and trauma is foundational to changing generational poverty, drug use, and incarceration. Our trauma-informed practices consider the impacts of trauma and toxic stress and utilize strengths within the community by hiring and training peer leaders. Our model has successfully built community workforce capacity, increased leadership, supported family/community bonding, and improved literacy in children. Our peer leaders apply the latest neuroscientific understanding of both trauma and resiliency. The success has come from applying the Harvard Center for the Developing Child resiliency builders “prescription”: Peers help children 1) sustain supportive relationships, 2) learn coping skills to manage stress, 3) become more trustful of services, and 4) help families feel a sense of community cohesion. Program results include a daily Walking School Bus to improve attendance, nightly family dinners with literacy activities, community celebrations, and an annual public awareness campaign.
All Skill Levels
Audience: Advocates, Asset Managers, Community Organizing Staff, Developers, Government Staff, Project Managers, Resident Services Staff, Service Providers
Moderator: Jennifer Dhillon, Healthy Generations Project
Panel: Brenda Kittrell, Healthy Generations Project; Darbi Howard, My Red Shoes; Eddie Kittrell, Healthy Generations Project; Susan Neufeld, BRIDGE Housing

View Presentation.


Asset Management, Property Management & Resident Services (Session 2)

Housekeeping, Hoarding, and Risk

This workshop addresses a situation that is bad for both tenants and affordable housing providers. Poor housekeeping on a tenant’s part can become a liability for a landlord. A unit that doesn’t meet Housing Quality Standards can lose its subsidy. And resulting smells and vermin can cause adjacent tenants to take action against their landlord. To prevent this, landlords may move to evict. This is especially true in the case of tenants who are hoarders. This workshop will help affordable housing operators sensitively deal with the needs of these tenants and also minimize risk from lost subsidies and habitability lawsuits.
All Skill Levels
Audience: Advocates, Asset Managers, Resident Services Staff, Property Managers
Moderator: Kayne Doumani, Chinatown Community Development Center
Panel: Dara Papo, San Francisco Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing; Nils Rosenquest, Rosenquest & Associates; Stephen Leader, Mental Health Association of San Francisco

View Presentation.


Housing Development (Session 2)

Creating Community-Serving Commercial Spaces

Commercial space in affordable housing communities provides an opportunity to enrich the neighborhood social infrastructure, secure long term affordable space, build capacity among smaller nonprofits to weather neighborhood displacement, and contribute to the direct well-being of our residents through beneficial partnerships. Learn how several organizations are looking beyond retail and traditional options to intentionally reach out to arts organizations, early education, youth and recreation organizations, and advocacy and social services, as an integral part of affordable housing development. Discussion topics include screening for and developing arts space, working with large and small community and social services organizations, understanding their physical/design needs and financial capacity, coordination from outreach to MOU to LOI to Lease, leasing and ownership considerations, to build or not (warm shell, cold shell, and tenant improvements), and a summary of financing options.
All Skill Levels
Audience: Advocates, Asset Managers, Attorneys, Community Organizing Staff, Developers, Government Staff, Lenders, Project Managers, Resident Services Staff
Moderator: Andrea Papanastassiou, Northern California Community Loan Fund
Panel: Jason Vargas, East Bay Asian Local Development Corporation; Karoleen Feng, Mission Economic Development Agency; Nancy Conover, Mercy Housing


Housing Development (Session 2)

Strategies for Engaging Residents in Bay Area Preservation Efforts

Across the Bay Area, the practice of acquiring, rehabbing, and ensuring the long-term affordability of market-rate, occupied properties* (“acq/rehab”) has gained traction as both an anti-displacement and long-term affordable housing strategy. In contrast to new production or rehabbing vacant buildings, working with existing residents is an integral piece of this process. This creates a host of new opportunities and challenges, from the promise of tenant empowerment to the difficult work of building trust and transitioning to new property management practices. This panel will explore different approaches to resident engagement and involvement in acq/rehab projects, highlighting the tradeoffs and considerations for a range of affordable housing models. Drawing from their diverse experience and roles, panelists will discuss what working with residents looks like at different phases of the process – from identifying high-priority properties in the community to performing rehab and property management duties – and help outline some best practices as acq/rehab grows as a preservation strategy.

*These units are commonly referred to as “Naturally Occurring Affordable Housing” (NOAH). However, given that the housing market has been shaped by intentional practices like redlining, Enterprise and other stakeholders are encouraging the industry to refer to these unsubsidized and unrestricted housing units as “market-rate affordable.”
All Skill Levels
Audience: Advocates, Community Organizing Staff, Developers, Government Staff, Lenders, Project Managers, Resident Services Staff
Moderator: James Yelen, Enterprise Community Partners
Panel: Johnny Oliver, Mission Economic Development Agency; Joseph Smooke, Housing Rights Committee of San Francisco; Karen Denicore, East Bay Asian Local Development Corporation; Nick Williams, San Francisco Community Land Trust

View Presentation.

Action items:

  • Promote acquisition-rehab of market-rate, unsubsidized affordable housing as a critical preservation and anti-displacement strategy, with an emphasis on resident involvement and empowerment. This includes making sure that new sources of funds for affordable housing include carve-outs for acquisition-rehab, distinguishing this work from new construction.
  • Ensure that programs and funding for acquisition-rehab meet the need of existing communities, including those living in small and medium-sized properties.
  • Recognize that acquisition-rehab of occupied buildings requires a different approach to engaging residents than new construction and preserving vacant properties, which creates both challenges and opportunities that need to be taken into account when supporting this work.

Links:

Contact info:


Housing Finance (Session 2)

New Financing Sources for Health and Affordable Housing

This workshop will provide an overview of innovative health and affordable housing financing to support healthy community initiatives. We will discuss how hospital community benefit obligations have been used to finance health and housing initiatives as well as direct health care investment strategies. The workshop will also explore innovative CDFI financing tools including Equity With A Twist and SPARC Initiative. The goal of this workshop is to provide the participants with an overview of a broad array of financing and technical assistance tools that they can pursue towards their own healthy community initiatives. The panelists will provide specific financing examples that they have deployed in the past few years.
Beginner, Intermediate
Audience: Community Organizing Staff, Government Staff, All sectors
Moderator: Bob Zdenek, Public Health Institute
Panel: Eliza Love, Public Health Institute; Dr. Joshua Bamberger, Non-Profit Housing Association of Northern California and University of California San Francisco; Pablo Bravo, Dignity Health System

View Presentation.


Housing Finance (Session 2)

Welcome to the Land of OZ: An Introduction to Opportunity Zones

The 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act created Opportunity Zones, using tax incentives to encourage private investment capital toward low-income communities. California has identified 879 census tracts throughout the State as Opportunity Zones. This workshop will describe the current landscape at the federal and local level and the types of projects that could utilize this new resource. Panelists will also discuss concerns of investments potentially furthering gentrification and dislocation of neighborhood residents and businesses, and will look at mechanisms to ensure this potential flood of investment is well-directed toward confirmed community needs.

All Skill Levels
Audience: All sectors
Moderator: Diana Downton, Community Economics
Panel: Ari Beliak, Bank of America Merrill Lynch; Jack Tse, Northern California Community Loan Fund; Kevin Wilson, Novogradac & Company LLP; Sarah Brundage, Enterprise Community Partners

View Presentation.


Policy & Advocacy (Session 2)

Moving the Housing Package Forward: An Implementation Update

In this workshop, staff from the Department of Housing and Community Development will discuss efforts to implement the California 2017 Housing Package in four key areas: streamlined production, permanent funding, preservation, and accountability and enforcement. Speakers will demonstrate interactive tools and new resources to help local officials, developers, and advocates understand the housing package and take advantage of its opportunities. Staff will also discuss available technical assistance and upcoming milestones and funding opportunities. Finally, attendees will have an opportunity to provide feedback on upcoming efforts related to preservation.
All Skill Levels
Audience: Advocates, Attorneys, Community Organizing Staff, Developers, Government Staff
Moderator: Ben Metcalf, California Department of Housing and Community Development
Panel: Harrison Anixter, California Department of Housing and Community Development; Melinda Coy, California Department of Housing and Community Development; Sasha Wisotsky, California Department of Housing and Community Development


Policy & Advocacy (Session 2)

Strategic Communications: Using Personal Stories for Impact

This workshop will show you how to collect and incorporate the personal stories of affordable housing residents in strategic communications; communicating the best message, through the right channels at the right time to address the goals, priorities, and vision of your organization. This innovative tactic puts a human face on the affordable housing movement and you will learn how to use it to drive support for and awareness within and outside of your organization. Personal stories complement and amplify reports, public policy advocacy, news releases, webpages, and any other communications methodology. Panelists will share creative communications used for personal stories and residents will outline how they put their story together, describing how affordable housing has changed their lives for the better. This workshop is a nuts-and-bolts training and communications strategy with real life examples. It is based on NPH’s innovative #MyHomeStory project.
Intermediate, Advanced
Audience: Advocates, Community Organizing Staff, Developers, Government Staff, Project Managers, Resident Services Staff
Moderator: Rachel Richman, Non-Profit Housing Association of Northern California
Panel: Christina Gotuaco, EAH Housing; Derrhea McLiechey-Davidson, Catholic Charities of Santa Clara County; Michael Norris, Housing Trust Silicon Valley; Tim Starritt, Resident Leader

View Presentation.

View Handout.


Session 3 (3:30PM-5:00PM)


Advancing Equity in Housing (Session 3)

Building Support for Affordable Housing in Affluent Neighborhoods

Unfortunately, the majority of multi-family affordable housing is built in already-marginalized communities. For example, Menlo Park zoned for 10,000 new housing units, but all in the Black community of Belle Haven. This ensures that patterns of segregation will continue. However, we have had success in organizing community support for affordable housing in affluent communities (Belmont, Burlingame, the west side of Menlo Park, and Millbrae), and we want to share our techniques and approach.
Beginner, Intermediate
Audience: Advocates, Community Organizing Staff, Developers, Government Staff
Moderator: Mayor Rick Bonilla, City of San Mateo
Panel: Elaine Uang, Palo Alto Forward; Leora Tanjuatco Ross, Housing Leadership Council of San Mateo County; Sophia DeWitt, East Bay Housing Organizations


Asset Management, Property Management & Resident Services (Session 3)

Advocacy Tactics for Resident Services Teams

With affordable housing measures offering nearly $7 billion in funding on the local and state ballot this November, many resident services teams are seeking opportunities to build civic engagement into existing community programs. This workshop will provide guidance, insight and offer tested methods for introducing advocacy engagement to affordable housing residents on site. Hear directly from resident services staff, who will share experiences and tested strategies from previous years. Learn about the existing measures on the November ballot that have the potential to fund further development of affordable housing. Learn what resources exist on the local and state levels to help you develop a civic engagement program and how to respect privacy while encouraging civic engagement. The panel will also discuss how to maintain engagement beyond the 2018 elections. Advocacy does not stop at Election Day, and there are legislative advocacy opportunities that exist for 2019.
All Skill Levels
Audience: Advocates, Community Organizing Staff, Resident Services Staff
Moderator: JR Starrett, Non-Profit Housing Association of Northern California
Panel: Geoffrey Morgan, First Community Housing; Tiffany Wong, EAH Housing; Hang Mosier, SAHA Housing; Constance Slider Pierre, Housing California


Asset Management, Property Management & Resident Services (Session 3)

POE and Building Performance Evaluation: Sharing How We Learn

Operators/asset managers and designers/developers rarely share a forum about building performance feedback, even though data collection efforts usually have an audience with both stakeholder groups. The data about performance that gets back to the development team for new projects tends to be the result of an internal design standards process, whereas there are a number of ways design decisions could be better informed, more responsive to recent lessons, and more nimble if there were a coordinated effort to share other methods of performance evaluation, including post-occupancy reviews with residents and whole-building utility data. In addition to providing bottom-line benefits, more coordinated post-occupancy evaluation has the potential to feed high-quality information about resident needs, health and wellness, energy and water use, operations, and building functionality into standards for design and operation as well as into policies that govern development requirements and incentives. This workshop invites different stakeholders to share their latest experience in evaluating building performance and engages participants in discussing how to build a shared platform for learning about and improving affordable housing projects.
All Skill Levels
Audience: Advocates, Asset Managers, Developers, Project Managers, Resident Services Staff
Moderator: Katie Ackerly, David Baker Architects
Panel: Jennifer Reed, Eden Housing; Katherine Fleming, BRIDGE Housing; Nevada Merriman, MidPen Housing

View Presentation.

Action Item: 

Non-profits have used multiple methods to evaluate building performance – utility data tracking, post-occupancy surveys, town-hall meetings, interdepartmental meetings – and there are seldom opportunities to share successful approaches. Meanwhile, non-profits can struggle to dedicate resources to certain kinds of evaluation, although there has been increasing interest in everything from benchmarking energy, water and waste, to documenting health outcomes and feedback from residents. Greater coordination and collaboration around the topic of building performance may enable non-profits to leverage successes from their peers, improve design standards, and even inform policy. If you would like to be involved in a working group supporting coordination of performance evaluation methods and data collection across disciplines, please contact Katie Ackerly, at katieackerly@dbarchitect.com.


Housing Development (Session 3)

Working Together: Developing Supportive Housing to Address Homelessness

This panel will explore the partnerships needed to develop a successful supportive housing system and the need to work together. The implementation of 2016 Measure A Affordable Housing Bond is Santa Clara’s County’s bold commitment to invest close to $750 million of the $950 million to develop 4,800 units of supportive housing county-wide. The County has completed its first funding year, committing $111,030,000 in six cities to create 10 housing developments with 817 new apartments. Hear from the partners what it has taken to implement this program. Panelists will highlight both successes and lessons learned on a range of issues including engaging neighborhoods, coordinated funding and referrals, and developer and service provider roles and needs.
All Skill Levels
Audience: Advocates, Developers, Government Staff,
Moderator: Ray Bramson, Destination: Home
Panel: Consuelo Hernandez, County of Santa Clara; Jonathan Veach, City of Santa Clara; Katherine Harasz, Santa Clara County Housing Authority; Rachel VanderVeen, City of San José; Regina Celestin Williams, First Community Housing; Sara Erickson, Resources for Community Development


Housing Finance (Session 3)

CDLAC/TCAC Update

The California Debt Limit Allocation Committee (CDLAC) Executive Director and California Tax Credit Allocation Committee (CTCAC) Executive Director will discuss program trends and issues, highlight proposed regulation changes, answer your burning questions, and listen to your great ideas. This is your chance to hear about and shape tax credit and bond policy for California.
Intermediate
Audience: Accountants, Attorneys, Developers, Government Staff, Lenders, Project Managers
Moderator: Mark Stivers, CaliforniaTax Credit Allocation Committee
Panel: Laura Whittall-Scherfee, California Debt Limit Allocation Committee

View Presentation.


Housing Finance (Session 3)

The Latest Trends in Multifamily Lending: Exploring Options

Nonprofit developers of multifamily homes in California are fortunate to have a wide range of financing options to choose from, with an increasing number of choices and competitive terms. A panel of experienced lenders will help guide attendees through the maze, including conventional and tax-exempt loan products, private placements, Fannie/Freddie/FHA structures, and refinancing options to lock in interest rates. The panel will include a capital markets expert to guide developers through the current interest rate environment and various hedge options. The panel will also address current financing options for a range of developments, including resyndications, project-based Section 8, mixed-income, mixed use, HCD-financed projects, and other critical topics.
All Skill Levels
Audience: Attorneys, Developers, Government Staff, Lenders, Project Managers
Moderator: Richard Mandel, California Housing Partnership
Panel: Cecile Chalifour, Chase; Elizabeth Van Benschoten, Union Bank; Fiona Hsu, Silicon Valley Bank; John Kauh, Wells Fargo; Kenji Tamaoki, PGIM Real Estate Finance; Lisa Gutierrez, US Bank


Policy & Advocacy (Session 3)

Inclusionary Housing 2.0: Designing Local Inclusionary Ordinances After AB 1505

This workshop will provide a variety of perspectives on inclusionary housing as a tool for local communities to promote the development of affordable housing and to foster the inclusion of populations that have historically been denied housing opportunities. Following a brief description of the inclusionary housing’s historical legal context, including AB 1505, 2017’s “Palmer Fix” bill, local housing advocates will describe efforts to advocate for and design inclusionary housing policies that maximize the affordable housing benefit to the community without stifling new market-rate development. The panel will explore the intersection of inclusionary housing with other local affordable housing policies, including housing impact fees and density bonuses. Topics will include the pros and cons of a regional approach to inclusionary housing, using inclusionary housing as a tool to address the housing needs of particular groups, including moderate-income households (aka “the missing middle”), extremely low-income households, and people with developmental disabilities, and coalition-building among advocacy groups.
Intermediate
Audience: Advocates, Attorneys, Community Organizing Staff, Developers, Government Staff
Moderator: Melissa Morris, Public Interest Law Project
Panel: Evelyn Stivers, Housing Leadership Council of San Mateo County; Jan Stokley, Housing Choices Coalition; Leslye Corsiglia, SV@Home

View Presentation.


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